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Local networking events

Have you ever been invited to a networking breakfast? Or a networking lunch? These may should sort of strange to the person who has never been to one before, but these types of situations are key to moving yourself to talk with others about what you do, how you do it, and what you provide in the form of services and products.

Many areas have their own type of networking events

These include business meetings to talk about the economy, or business meetings to set new ordinances for the local surroundings – everywhere you have people; you have the opportunity to ‘do’ additional networking. The more people you know and talk with the stronger your network of business contacts and customer contact is going to become.

The first step to successful local networking is going to involve doing it

You need to get out there, and be where other business owners are, or at least where large groups of people are going to be found. Next, you need a good opening question. The best question you can ask a person when you are networking is, what do you do? This is not only going to open the door to talking with another person, but also it is going to open the door for that person in turn to ask you what you do – which is just what you want them to ask you!

Networking should be done in conversation when you are in situations where you don’t know someone all that well. Business cards are often given out, and passed around. If you are heading off to a club meeting, or a networking business affair, you should also have marketing materials with you, such as a brochure or some type of printed matter to show and tell others what you do. As others find your materials handed to them, or presented on a table of information, they have something tangible to take with them, read later, and to think about later.

Collect phone number, emails and information about other businesses. As you collect information about others, you will soon learn that you can use this information after you are back at the office, back at your own business. Create a marketing package for each individual that you have met. Mail out the information with a personal note from you, that it was great talking with you, and you just wanted to share some additional information about your business with them, in case they ever have a need for a product or service that you provide. This is very straight marketing, after the initial networking event, make it work for you!

If you are managing a team of IT workers or just have a secretary sitting in front of a computer, chances are that they don’t spend all of their paid work time doing their assigned jobs. Instead, they might be doing all sorts of stuff: reading news, watching YouTube flicks, or even playing computer games. As obvious as it sounds, it is not easy to catch them playing an office-killer game, as these games often come with the ‘boss key’ feature, which makes the game disappear quickly when they press a single button.

 

What can you do to make your employees more productive, and to stop them from chatting or playing games at the workplace?

 

The first and obvious choice, at least for IT related industries, is using Windows built-in user account control and security policies to prevent running any applications that are not explicitly permitted. For example, this would limit the download and use of any chat and instant messenger programs. Unfortunately, too tight a policy can severely limit their working performance should they need to do something that was not initially permitted. On the other hand, a too loose policy may open doors to Flash-based games, Java or even Web-based chats. Finding the right balance between security and productivity is a complex and time consuming task.

 

The second obvious choice, especially for non-IT professions, is putting a video surveillance system in place. Video cameras, even if they aren’t actually recording, are great psychological stimuli that help employees concentrate on work instead of entertainment. On the other hand, video surveillance is often perceived as a major drawback by employees, and may even be criticized and opposed by the unions. For a small company, video surveillance may be too much of a commitment.

 

 

 

 

Installing software that will monitor your employee’s use of their computers does not have the drawbacks of overly tight security policies or the opposition associated with video surveillance. Unlike security policies and user account control, logging software does not prevent users from doing things that are part of their job. It also does not stick on the wall to scare employees, and under no circumstances does it interfere with their private lives.

 

KGB Keylogger by Refog is a keyboard logging and monitoring product that perfectly complements a reasonable Windows security policy, and completely replaces obtrusive video surveillance at a fraction of the price. KGB Keylogger has a special feature set that is designed specifically for small companies. While completely invisible and unobtrusive to the employees, the product saves all key presses into a log file, registers all Web sites they visit, and makes periodic screen shots of their work PC. You can easily access these logs from a central FTP server, or have KGB Keylogger email them to you periodically. If they do a lot of typing, you can filter out Office applications to make the logs easier to read.

 

Complement your security policy and replace obtrusive video surveillance with KGB Keylogger at a fraction of the price. Download your free evaluation copy at: http://www.refog.com/

 

Video technology has increased significantly over the past years, and is continuing to grow at an incredible rate. Digital Video Disc’s aka DVD’s are the most likely the last big jump in consumer video technology that everyone is familiar with. To keep up with the ever advancing world of electronics a new format of video storage will be released soon called Blu-ray.

Blu-Ray is a next generation optical disc that will blow the socks off of what we all know today: DVD. Conventional DVD’s use a red laser that have long wave lengths, which limits the storage capacity on a disc. Blu-Ray uses a blue laser which has much shorter wave lengths. Because the wave lengths on the Blu-Ray are much smaller it can focus on a spot with much greater precision, allowing for data to be packed much more tightly than the red laser DVD’s.

Blu-Ray discs can hold up to 50GB’s of information which 10 times that of a 4.5GB DVD. 10 times the storage will greatly increase the amount of information that we can save on any one disc and will change the way we save information. Dual Layer Blu-Ray discs will be able to hold up to 4 hours of High-Definition Video. High Definition video is going to hit big here, Blu-Ray is an example of a technology that is going to make it happen. 50GB is probably comparable to size of many of our hard-drives, and to picture having all of that information on a small disc that we can slide into a pocket and take wherever we want is a bit scary.

Expect to see Blu-Ray replacing DVD and VCR over the next few years, following along with the transition of video to High Definition Video. Video isn’t the only thing that will benefit from Blu-Ray technology; I would expect that it will also become the standard for PC and other types of storage.

Feel free to reprint this article as long as you keep the following caption and author biography in tact with all hyperlinks.

There is a theory in law enforcement that goes something like this:

If someone breaks a window in a building, and it isn’t fixed quickly, others will soon be broken. As the evidence of neglect builds, vandals will be more emboldened to break into the building and commit more vandalism and eventually destroy it completely.

If, on the other hand, that window is promptly fixed, it discourages further crime because it is clear that someone is watching the store.

Further, if instead of just fixing the window, you find the vandal and hold them accountable for it, a message goes out loud and clear: we’re watching and you will get caught.

The problem with the broken windows theory is that it requires more than police action to put into practice. If the community isn’t involved in the cleanup effort, the initiative fails. When the community is drawn in to help police the problems, to report them and to ‘mind the store’, so to speak, crime rates drop.

This theory can be extended to police nearly any venue where there is unacceptable behavior – including the problem of click fraud in the venue of PPC advertising. At the moment, the PPC industry is like a vacant building with nobody watching the store. It’s easy to enter fraudulent clicks. It’s even easier to get away with it. At the moment, a large percentage of advertisers leave the detection of fraudulent clicks up to the PPC provider – and the policy of most PPC providers is that they will provide refunds for proven click fraud upon request from the advertiser.

What happens when:

– The PPC provider’s software detection methods don’t catch the click fraud?

– The advertiser doesn’t use fraud detection software?

– The advertiser can’t back up the claim of click fraud?

– The major players in the industry refer to the problem as ‘negligible’?

Simply put – the click fraudster gets away with it. The rewards are enormous – estimates put the amount of money lost to click fraud in the range of billions of dollars annually. But the loss to any individual advertiser is usually negligible, and even Google sees refunding money to advertisers as no more than the cost of doing business.

If we’re ever going to put a dent in click fraud, three things have to happen.

1. Advertisers have to take responsibility for monitoring their own campaigns. If you don’t know it’s happening, you can’t take steps to stop it.

2. Advertisers need to use the information they generate through their analytics to demand refunds from the PPC companies on a consistent basis. As long as the losses are minor compared to the profits for the PPC companies, their incentive for responding is limited.

3. Click fraud perpetrators have to be identified, actively pursued and penalized. Currently, modern techniques that use proxies and ‘zombie networks’ can make it almost impossible to identify and punish offenders.

Those are the three elements of the Broken Window theory that make it work – community action, official backing and action and penalizing perpetrators.

The first element in combating click fraud as a community is in getting click fraud prevention and tracking software into the hands of all advertisers. The difficulty of sifting through hundreds of pages of data to make comparisons and weed out patterns that signal click fraud is a daunting one for most companies.

Click fraud detection software makes it almost painless – but can be expensive. Other parts of the internet market have benefited from open sourcing of software to manage content, manipulate graphics, and create communities and process payments. An open offering of free click fraud prevention software will encourage advertisers to start monitoring their own logs and records and identify potential fraudulent clicks.

In addition, an open offering encourages others to modify and extend the software and make those extensions available to the community at large.

With those monitors in place, the second part of the equation becomes more possible. When it’s easy for advertisers to identify and document fraudulent clicks on their campaigns, it becomes that much easier for them to demand refunds for those clicks. The third part is an outgrowth of creating a community that actively works to eliminate click fraud.

For the time being, click fraudsters are loose in a neighborhood of broken windows. With the right tools, we can begin to repair the windows and create a community that makes it nearly impossible to get away with their tactics.

There is a theory in law enforcement that goes something like this:

If someone breaks a window in a building, and it isn’t fixed quickly, others will soon be broken. As the evidence of neglect builds, vandals will be more emboldened to break into the building and commit more vandalism and eventually destroy it completely.

If, on the other hand, that window is promptly fixed, it discourages further crime because it is clear that someone is watching the store.

Further, if instead of just fixing the window, you find the vandal and hold them accountable for it, a message goes out loud and clear: we’re watching and you will get caught.

The problem with the broken windows theory is that it requires more than police action to put into practice. If the community isn’t involved in the cleanup effort, the initiative fails. When the community is drawn in to help police the problems, to report them and to ‘mind the store’, so to speak, crime rates drop.

This theory can be extended to police nearly any venue where there is unacceptable behavior – including the problem of click fraud in the venue of PPC advertising. At the moment, the PPC industry is like a vacant building with nobody watching the store. It’s easy to enter fraudulent clicks. It’s even easier to get away with it. At the moment, a large percentage of advertisers leave the detection of fraudulent clicks up to the PPC provider – and the policy of most PPC providers is that they will provide refunds for proven click fraud upon request from the advertiser.

What happens when:

– The PPC provider’s software detection methods don’t catch the click fraud?
– The advertiser doesn’t use fraud detection software?
– The advertiser can’t back up the claim of click fraud?
– The major players in the industry refer to the problem as ‘negligible’?

Simply put – the click fraudster gets away with it. The rewards are enormous – estimates put the amount of money lost to click fraud in the range of billions of dollars annually. But the loss to any individual advertiser is usually negligible, and even Google sees refunding money to advertisers as no more than the cost of doing business.

If we’re ever going to put a dent in click fraud, three things have to happen.

1. Advertisers have to take responsibility for monitoring their own campaigns. If you don’t know it’s happening, you can’t take steps to stop it.

2. Advertisers need to use the information they generate through their analytics to demand refunds from the PPC companies on a consistent basis. As long as the losses are minor compared to the profits for the PPC companies, their incentive for responding is limited.

3. Click fraud perpetrators have to be identified, actively pursued and penalized. Currently, modern techniques that use proxies and ‘zombie networks’ can make it almost impossible to identify and punish offenders.

Those are the three elements of the Broken Window theory that make it work – community action, official backing and action and penalizing perpetrators.

The first element in combating click fraud as a community is in getting click fraud prevention and tracking software into the hands of all advertisers. The difficulty of sifting through hundreds of pages of data to make comparisons and weed out patterns that signal click fraud is a daunting one for most companies.

Click fraud detection software makes it almost painless – but can be expensive. Other parts of the internet market have benefited from open sourcing of software to manage content, manipulate graphics, and create communities and process payments. An open offering of free click fraud prevention software will encourage advertisers to start monitoring their own logs and records and identify potential fraudulent clicks.

In addition, an open offering encourages others to modify and extend the software and make those extensions available to the community at large.

With those monitors in place, the second part of the equation becomes more possible. When it’s easy for advertisers to identify and document fraudulent clicks on their campaigns, it becomes that much easier for them to demand refunds for those clicks. The third part is an outgrowth of creating a community that actively works to eliminate click fraud.

For the time being, click fraudsters are loose in a neighborhood of broken windows. With the right tools, we can begin to repair the windows and create a community that makes it nearly impossible to get away with their tactics.

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